Nepal Safari

National Parks and Wildlife Reserves
There is too much pressure on the natural resources because of rapid growth in population. So the problems of forest depletion, soil erosion, landslide, water pollution, etc. are globally increasing. As a result, there is the loss of natural habitat of the wildlife. Natural resources must be preserved for the conservation of the environment and for our future generations as they are invaluable gift of nature. National parks and wildlife reserves are separated for the purpose of safety of wild animals and natural resources.

Chitwan National Park
This is Nepal’s first and famous national park which is established in 2030 B.S. and has covered an area of 923 sq.km. This National Park is situated in the district of Chitwan, Makwanpur and Parsa of Narayani Zone in Central Development Region in inner Terai .This national park has been included in the list of world heritages sites in 2041 B.S (after 11 yrs. of establishment). It contains Chure hills, Rapti valley, Rapti River and main region of Narayani and Reu River is covered by dense tall elephant grass interspersed with riverine forests of silk cotton (kapok), acacia and sisam trees. This ecologically diverse area is the last remaining home in Nepal for more than 300 of the endangered Asian one-horned rhinoceros and harbors one of the largest populations of the elusive and rare Bengal tiger. Besides rhino and tiger, Chitwan also supports a great variety of flora and fauna. There are four species of deer, including the spotted Chittal, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Wild Boar, Rhesus monkey, Grey Langur monkey, Wild Dog, Small Wild Cats, the White Stockinged gaur (the world’s largest wild cattle) and many other smaller animals. The swampy areas and numerous oxbow lakes of Chitwan provide a home for marsh crocodiles. In a stretch of the Narayani river is found one of the few remaining populations of the rare and endangered fish-only eating gharial, or Gangetic crocodile. Here also is found one of the world’s four species of freshwater dolphins. For the ornithologist and the amateur bird-watcher the park offers excellent possibilities with more than 450 species recorded. Some of the resident specialities are several species of woodpeckers, hornbills, Bengal florican, and red-headed trogons. Winter birds such as waterfowl, Brahminy duck, pintails and bareheaded geese, amongst many other cold weather visitors are drawn by the sanctuary of the park’s rivers. In the summer the forest is alive with nesting migrants such as the fabulous paradise flycatcher, the Indian pitta and parakeets.

Bardia National Park
Bardia National Park is Nepal’s most westerly, and the largest of its seven National Parks. A haven for a wide variety of wildlife, the park was originally formed to protect the various ecosystems found in the area, and to conserve tigers and their prey. The Park has since expanded to become one of the finest in Nepal. Lush dense forests, savannah and riverine woodlands are home to an incredibly diverse range of flora and fauna. Endangered species such as Rhinoceros, Wild elephant, Tiger, Swamp deer, Gharial crocodile, Gangetic dolphin, Bengal Florican and the Sarus crane are all found here.
The parks origins began in the late 1960’s when some 368 sq. km were set aside as royal hunting grounds. However, it wasn’t until 1982 that the Royal Bardia National Reserve was officially formed, and even then it didn’t become a fully-fledged National Park until 1988. The aim was to preserve the diversity of decreasing species, in particular the tiger and its natural prey species.
Over 1400 people living in the area, many of them farmers, were removed to provide a greater area for the abundant species within the park. A buffer zone and community forest were established around the park to try to reduce subsistence poaching inside the park by the local communities. Without so much human interference the diverse habitats inside the park have improved greatly. Bardia’s relatively remote location has meant the Park has enjoyed minimum impact from tourism, and though access has improved significantly over recent years, visitor numbers are still much lower than Nepal’s most famous park, Chitwan.
It wasn’t until the mid-90 that basic facilities for travelers began to appear. Since then, tourism has started to increase and there now are a variety of lodges to choose from. To date the impact of visiting travelers has been minimal and the experience for a visitor is very different to that in Chitwan National Park as you feel much closer to nature and completely removed from bright lights shops, restaurants, bars and traffic.
Getting to Bardia
From Kathmandu: Daily buses run from Kathmandu to Mahendrenagar (alight at Ambassa). The bus takes around 15 hours and is a beautiful though long journey as you pass through mountains and forests and then through the mainly flat and rural Terai. Tickets cost from 1200 Nepalese Rupees (approx. US$17). Night buses also operate. There are also daily flights to Nepalgunj from Kathmandu for around 11,400 NR (approx. US$158) which make the journey much shorter and easier.
From Nepalgunj: Two buses per day go to Thakudwara at 11am and 2.30pm, taking 3-4 hours and costing around 100 NR. We can also pick you up from Nepalgunj airport and transfer you directly to the lodge (approx. 3 hours).
From Mahendranagar: Daily buses run from Mahendrenagar to Kathmandu (alight at Ambassa), the bus takes around 4-5 hours, costing around 200 NR.
From India: You can travel to Bardia from India by coming via Banbassa-Mahendranagar or Rupidha-Nepalgunj border crossing points.
Ambassa: The actual park entrance is situated close to the small village of Thakurdwara, 14km southwest along a dirt/gravel road from Ambassa on the Mahendra Highway. A handful of buses run each day from Ambassa to Thakurdwara for around 30 NR. The journey takes around 30 minutes. We can also pick you up from the junction.
Sagarmatha National Park(Mt. Everest)
Unique among natural heritage sites world-wide is the Sagarmatha National Park, which includes Mt. Everest (8,848 m) and other high peaks such as Lhotse Shar, Cho Oyu, Ama Dablam, Pumori, Kangtega, Gyachung Kang, Thamserku and Kwangde. Located North-east of Kathmandu, Sagarmatha National Park is 1,148 sq km. in area and consists of the upper catchment areas of the Dudh Koshi, Bhote Koshi and the Imja Khola rivers. Much of the park lies above 3,000m. Sagarmatha is rugged, with deep gorges, glaciers and unnegotiable ice and rock faces. Locally known as the ’Khumbu’, it is the home of the famous Sherpa people. The Sherpas make a living by farming barley and potatoes and graze their yaks in high altitude pastures. Young Sherpas have also made their name in mountaineering and the trekking industry has of late become the community’s economic mainstay. In 1979 the park was declared a World Heritage Site. 
National Parks and Wildlife Reserves
There is too much pressure on the natural resources because of rapid growth in population. So the problems of forest depletion, soil erosion, landslide, water pollution, etc. are globally increasing. As a result, there is the loss of natural habitat of the wildlife. Natural resources must be preserved for the conservation of the environment and for our future generations as they are invaluable gift of nature. National parks and wildlife reserves are separated for the purpose of safety of wild animals and natural resources.

Chitwan National Park
This is Nepal’s first and famous national park which is established in 2030 B.S. and has covered an area of 923 sq.km. This National Park is situated in the district of Chitwan, Makwanpur and Parsa of Narayani Zone in Central Development Region in inner Terai .This national park has been included in the list of world heritages sites in 2041 B.S (after 11 yrs. of establishment). It contains Chure hills, Rapti valley, Rapti River and main region of Narayani and Reu River is covered by dense tall elephant grass interspersed with riverine forests of silk cotton (kapok), acacia and sisam trees. This ecologically diverse area is the last remaining home in Nepal for more than 300 of the endangered Asian one-horned rhinoceros and harbors one of the largest populations of the elusive and rare Bengal tiger. Besides rhino and tiger, Chitwan also supports a great variety of flora and fauna. There are four species of deer, including the spotted Chittal, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Wild Boar, Rhesus monkey, Grey Langur monkey, Wild Dog, Small Wild Cats, the White Stockinged gaur (the world’s largest wild cattle) and many other smaller animals. The swampy areas and numerous oxbow lakes of Chitwan provide a home for marsh crocodiles. In a stretch of the Narayani river is found one of the few remaining populations of the rare and endangered fish-only eating gharial, or Gangetic crocodile. Here also is found one of the world’s four species of freshwater dolphins. For the ornithologist and the amateur bird-watcher the park offers excellent possibilities with more than 450 species recorded. Some of the resident specialities are several species of woodpeckers, hornbills, Bengal florican, and red-headed trogons. Winter birds such as waterfowl, Brahminy duck, pintails and bareheaded geese, amongst many other cold weather visitors are drawn by the sanctuary of the park’s rivers. In the summer the forest is alive with nesting migrants such as the fabulous paradise flycatcher, the Indian pitta and parakeets.

Bardia National Park
Bardia National Park is Nepal’s most westerly, and the largest of its seven National Parks. A haven for a wide variety of wildlife, the park was originally formed to protect the various ecosystems found in the area, and to conserve tigers and their prey. The Park has since expanded to become one of the finest in Nepal. Lush dense forests, savannah and riverine woodlands are home to an incredibly diverse range of flora and fauna. Endangered species such as Rhinoceros, Wild elephant, Tiger, Swamp deer, Gharial crocodile, Gangetic dolphin, Bengal Florican and the Sarus crane are all found here.
The parks origins began in the late 1960’s when some 368 sq. km were set aside as royal hunting grounds. However, it wasn’t until 1982 that the Royal Bardia National Reserve was officially formed, and even then it didn’t become a fully-fledged National Park until 1988. The aim was to preserve the diversity of decreasing species, in particular the tiger and its natural prey species.
Over 1400 people living in the area, many of them farmers, were removed to provide a greater area for the abundant species within the park. A buffer zone and community forest were established around the park to try to reduce subsistence poaching inside the park by the local communities. Without so much human interference the diverse habitats inside the park have improved greatly. Bardia’s relatively remote location has meant the Park has enjoyed minimum impact from tourism, and though access has improved significantly over recent years, visitor numbers are still much lower than Nepal’s most famous park, Chitwan.
It wasn’t until the mid-90 that basic facilities for travelers began to appear. Since then, tourism has started to increase and there now are a variety of lodges to choose from. To date the impact of visiting travelers has been minimal and the experience for a visitor is very different to that in Chitwan National Park as you feel much closer to nature and completely removed from bright lights shops, restaurants, bars and traffic.
Getting to Bardia
From Kathmandu: Daily buses run from Kathmandu to Mahendrenagar (alight at Ambassa). The bus takes around 15 hours and is a beautiful though long journey as you pass through mountains and forests and then through the mainly flat and rural Terai. Tickets cost from 1200 Nepalese Rupees (approx. US$17). Night buses also operate. There are also daily flights to Nepalgunj from Kathmandu for around 11,400 NR (approx. US$158) which make the journey much shorter and easier.
From Nepalgunj: Two buses per day go to Thakudwara at 11am and 2.30pm, taking 3-4 hours and costing around 100 NR. We can also pick you up from Nepalgunj airport and transfer you directly to the lodge (approx. 3 hours).
From Mahendranagar: Daily buses run from Mahendrenagar to Kathmandu (alight at Ambassa), the bus takes around 4-5 hours, costing around 200 NR.
From India: You can travel to Bardia from India by coming via Banbassa-Mahendranagar or Rupidha-Nepalgunj border crossing points.
Ambassa: The actual park entrance is situated close to the small village of Thakurdwara, 14km southwest along a dirt/gravel road from Ambassa on the Mahendra Highway. A handful of buses run each day from Ambassa to Thakurdwara for around 30 NR. The journey takes around 30 minutes. We can also pick you up from the junction.
Sagarmatha National Park(Mt. Everest)
Unique among natural heritage sites world-wide is the Sagarmatha National Park, which includes Mt. Everest (8,848 m) and other high peaks such as Lhotse Shar, Cho Oyu, Ama Dablam, Pumori, Kangtega, Gyachung Kang, Thamserku and Kwangde. Located North-east of Kathmandu, Sagarmatha National Park is 1,148 sq km. in area and consists of the upper catchment areas of the Dudh Koshi, Bhote Koshi and the Imja Khola rivers. Much of the park lies above 3,000m. Sagarmatha is rugged, with deep gorges, glaciers and unnegotiable ice and rock faces. Locally known as the ’Khumbu’, it is the home of the famous Sherpa people. The Sherpas make a living by farming barley and potatoes and graze their yaks in high altitude pastures. Young Sherpas have also made their name in mountaineering and the trekking industry has of late become the community’s economic mainstay. In 1979 the park was declared a World Heritage Site. 
 

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